Marmee & Louisa

The Untold Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Mother

LaPlante, Eve

Book - 2012
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Marmee & Louisa
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The author argues that Louisa's "Marmee," Abigail May Alcott, was in fact the intellectual and emotional center of her daughter's world--exploding the myth that her outspoken idealist father was the source of her progressive thinking and remarkable independence.

Publisher: New York : Free Press, [2012]
Edition: 1st Free Press hardcover ed
ISBN: 1451620667
9781451620665
Branch Call Number: B A355L
PS1018 .L37 2012
Characteristics: ix, 368 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., map, ports. ; 25 cm

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Jun 18, 2013
  • timehascome rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

If you want to learn about the beginnings of the women's sufferage movement, this is the book.
Also, the struggle for emancipation
Well documented and well written

Jun 05, 2013
  • jgraham48 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

How did 18th-century people find the time to write so many letters and to keep journals ? Did they all have servants ?
Abigail May Alcott and her daughter, author Louisa May Alcott, lived during the time of the Civil War, negro emancipation, increasing urbanization of America, and birth pangs of feminism. Louisa May Alcott never married or had children, but she gave us terrific female characters and female experiences based on Abigail Alcott's lifelong journals and letters and on her own journals and experiences growing up with an improvident father and an intelligent, hard-working mother.
Eve LaPlante provides a wide-ranging account of the women in Louisa and Abigail Alcott's immediate families as well as their ancestors and their descendants. Well-documented from journal and letter sources.

Jan 15, 2013

"Biographer Eve LaPlante, distantly related to novelist Louisa May Alcott, found previously unknown Alcott family papers in her mother's attic. Drawing on that trove of information, LaPlante paints a detailed portrait of 19th-century feminist and writer Abigail Alcott and her daughter, Louisa May. LaPlante's account in Marmee & Louisa provides a fresh perspective on Louisa May's life and work and on Abigail's significant accomplishments - as well as the challenges that she and her family faced as a result of her husband Bronson's neglect." January 2013 Biography and Memoir Newsletter http://www.nextreads.com/Display2.aspx?SID=5acc8fc1-4e91-4ebe-906d-f8fc5e82a8e0&N=591080

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