X Vs. Y

X Vs. Y

A Culture War, A Love Story

eBook - 2014
Average Rating:
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Seen through the eyes of siblings 14 years apart in age, X vs. Y is a smart, funny, stylish, and visually driven anthology that comƯpiles and compares their two generational culƯtures. It's a story told through lists, infographics, essays, anecdotes, and images, with chapters devoted to fashion, TV, music, technology, dating, books, and movies. Through musings on topics such as leg warmers, Clueless, Sassy magazine, and MTV, along with mixtapes and TV characters, X vs. Y paints a portrait of two intricately entwined generations.
Publisher: [United States] : Abrams : Made available through hoopla, 2014
ISBN: 9781613125977
1613125976
Branch Call Number: eBook hoopla
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: Epstein, Leonora - Author
hoopla digital
Uniform Title: X versus Y

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b
britprincess1ajax
May 14, 2016

“Part of loving anything or anyone is not knowing exactly why.”

b
britprincess1ajax
May 14, 2016

“Ask Google which birth years define Gen X or Gen Y, and you'll come up with a lot of different answers. In our conversations, we've tended to treat Gen X as folks born in the mid-sixties to late seventies and Millennials/Gen Yers as people born around the early eighties to the late nineties. In speaking with friends of both generations, we found a distinct gray area where people born between 1979 and 1984 or so felt either that they were members of neither generation or that they were in a position to choose. Most in that position chose to identify with Gen X, because when given the choice between Doc Martens and foam footwear, the choice seems obvious.”

b
britprincess1ajax
May 14, 2016

“The idea that I don't have to be embarrassed by the rather large offering of Olivia Newton-John songs in my iTunes library is one I have trouble accepting.”

b
britprincess1ajax
May 14, 2016

“For Gen Y, the experiences Madonna bequeathed upon us existed in two separate domains. First, there was Madonna 1.0, an original, mythic vintage relic characterized by all her most classic hits of the eighties like ‘Vogue,’ ‘Lucky Star,’ ‘Like a Virgin,’ and a wardrobe containing pointy bras, rosaries, fingerless lace gloves--the stuff that would become costume templates for eighties nights and Halloweens. While she gave us fabulous memories, these came with larger cultural connotations already attached. [...] And then there was Madonna 2.0, which was pretty much everything after that. This was the point at which Madonna would reinvent herself with new identities faster than we could [...] From there, Madonna became something like a constantly changing background. And kind of like a slideshow screen saver, you could choose to sit and enjoy it for a bit, or turn it off and move on to other things.”

b
britprincess1ajax
May 14, 2016

“I was a late bloomer. And I don't mean ‘late bloomer’ by today's standards, which for all I know means waiting until you're fifteen to have a threesome. I mean I really took my time with the whole sex thing. Granted, I wasn't in much danger of being convinced otherwise; high school boys weren't exactly banging down my hymen.”

b
britprincess1ajax
May 14, 2016

“You can't always get what you want, and often that's precisely what you need.”

b
britprincess1ajax
May 14, 2016

“Millennials have a capacity for feeling nostalgia for things we can't actually lay claim to, and so we steal heavily from Gen X’s pool of awesomeness, cultivating extensive vinyl collections and obscure Pixies trivia knowledge.”

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b
britprincess1ajax
May 14, 2016

Charming and colourful, X VS Y is a light beach read. It recaps the pop culture that permeated the formative years of two sisters, born fourteen years apart. The writing is innocuous and nostalgic. Generation X is Eve Epstein who waxes on about Wham, bulky acrylic legwarmers, Saturday-morning cartoons, vinyl, and auteur David Lynch and his TWIN PEAKS in her personal essays, while her sister Leonora Epstein who represents Generation Y was more my speed, rattling on about the profundity of Aqua, Tom Green, CLUELESS, and chatrooms. I especially appreciated the line of similarity she cuts through RUGRATS, BUFFY, and NEW GIRL. It certainly captures the attention, even if only for a fleeting 190 pages. I recommend it.

v
v1h
Jan 07, 2015

I wasn't able to get too far in before I had to return it (the problem with having to many books waiting to be read before their due date) but I really enjoyed what I'd read and plan to borrow it again in the future and write a more in-depth review.

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