Siddhartha

Siddhartha

An Indian Tale

Book - 2003
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A bold translation of Nobel Prize-winner Herman Hesse's most inspirational and beloved work in a Penguin Classics deluxe edition

Hesse's famous and influential novel, Siddartha , is perhaps the most important and compelling moral allegory our troubled century has produced. Integrating Eastern and Western spiritual traditions with psychoanalysis and philosophy, this strangely simple tale, written with a deep and moving empathy for humanity, has touched the lives of millions since its original publication in 1922. Set in India, Siddhartha is the story of a young Brahmin's search for ultimate reality after meeting with the Buddha. His quest takes him from a life of decadence to asceticism, through the illusory joys of sensual love with a beautiful courtesan, and of wealth and fame, to the painful struggles with his son and the ultimate wisdom of renunciation. This new translation by award-winning translator Joachim Neugroschel includes an introduction by Hesse biographer Ralph Freedman.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
Publisher: New York, NY : Penguin Books, 2003, c1999
Edition: Deluxe ed
ISBN: 9780142437186
0142437182
Branch Call Number: HESSE H
PT2617.E85 S513 2003x
Characteristics: xxxv, 132 p. ; 22 cm

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India in the 4th or 3rd century B.C.E.


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h
humming
Sep 27, 2017

Definitely a keeper to reread occasionally just to notice the growth of my own "understanding" and application of the principles of the Oneness path. Recommend simply experiencing the story without trying to understand it.
I appreciate any writing, art, music that open my heart to more joy, peace and love!

t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Sep 20, 2017

The book is a story about Siddhartha, the story of a young man who is the son of a Brahmin. Siddartha, seeking to gain enlightenment, leaves his father and the future that his father had set for him. Siddhartha has various interactions in which he learns more about the meaning of life. First, he finds a Buddhist group that believes that the physical world is the direct source of pain and that the material world does not provide meaning. He then meets with Kamala, who teaches him about affection and love. He also learns about the art of trading with a wealthy trader named Kamaswami. Siddhartha abandons his lifestyle of lust and greed and becomes angered with himself, considering suicide. At the end of the journey, Siddhartha realizes the true meaning of life and achieves enlightenment. Siddhartha found that time did not mean anything and that wisdom can only be achieved through experience. Siddhartha could not find wisdom by asking others but through the combination of all the events that occurred in his journey to enlightenment. I think that this story is somewhat relatable to everyone. I would rate this 4/5 stars.
- @SuperSilk of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

k
kwsmith
Feb 24, 2017

A young man living in India struggles to find true meaning in his ordinary life. The obvious allegory is that Siddhartha's life closely follows the life of Buddha. This fascinating Nobel Prize winner contains many gems of wisdom (ironically the book teaches that true wisdom must be experienced and cannot be communicated). I found the writing style very accessible and at times almost poetic.

k
kaiseryang7
Dec 12, 2016

I am not Buddhist, but intuitively felt that this book held some of the secrets to the meaning of life. The author had a nervous breakdown while mid-way through composing this poetic prose, and I could tell why. Some of the lessons are inscrutable, but seem to bear the ring of truth. Reading this short book felt like a warm meal after fasting.

r
rlvinthe415
Oct 18, 2016

A simple book with a powerful message, I found Siddhartha a poetic tribute to Buddhism. I did not like how the book was so driven by a single character. I prefer a story with multiple viewpoints. For a more action oriented tribute to Buddhism, read Buddha by Osamu Tezuka.

c
cutemegz
Mar 17, 2016

Abit to Freudian for my tastes but it makes sense during the time it was written that it Sigmund Freud's ideas would have a lot of weight. None the less still an okay read.

c
Charlie68
Apr 08, 2015

A simple story beautifully told.

slothsrule Dec 09, 2014

Written in 1922 by the German author Hermann Hesse, about a young man and his coming of age story in quest of a spiritual truths and enlightenment. Many of the themes are timeless and definitely an insightful (and short read).

s
sdsheridan
Apr 15, 2014

Once I read this book back in High School, I began to read on a regular basis. I also became a fan of an author for the first time.

e
erinsnest
Aug 29, 2013

Aug 30, 2013....Such a tiny book, but my addiction to the hold button, has caused me to not have time to read it right now. I have renewed it twice, alas, now I must put it on the "later" shelf, and send it back. "See you later, Siddhartha!"

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sdsheridan
Apr 15, 2014

sdsheridan thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

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holdendale
Jul 16, 2010

holdendale thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

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FavouriteFiction Sep 30, 2009

Fortunate son Siddhartha discards his earthly pleasures to seek inner peace living the life of a wandering ascetic.

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