10 items
A Trip to the Moon (1902)
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Named as one of the 100 greatest films of the 20th century by The Village Voice, A Trip To The Moon is the best-known of the hundreds of films made by Fre...Show more Named as one of the 100 greatest films of the 20th century by The Village Voice, A Trip To The Moon is the best-known of the hundreds of films made by French filmmaker Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, It is widely regarded as the earliest example of the science fiction film genre and, more generally, as one of the most influential films in cinema history. This version is sourced from a rare, hand-painted colorization created at the time of release, thought lost, re-discovered in 1993 and restored in 2011. Show less
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919)
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A masterpiece of psychological horror and the film that has come to epitomize the mysterious highly stylized German Expressionist cinema. A demented hypno...Show more A masterpiece of psychological horror and the film that has come to epitomize the mysterious highly stylized German Expressionist cinema. A demented hypnotist and his ghastly henchman spread death througout the German countryside. Newly remastered from the archival German material and tinted according to original instructions with evocative score. Show less
The Golem: How He Came into the World (1920)
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Widely recognized as the source of the Frankenstein myth, the ancient Hebrew legend of the Golem provided actor/director Paul Wegener with the substance f...Show more Widely recognized as the source of the Frankenstein myth, the ancient Hebrew legend of the Golem provided actor/director Paul Wegener with the substance for one of the most adventurous films of the German silent cinema. Suffering under the tyrannical rule of Rudolf II in 16th-century Prague, a Talmudic rabbi (Albert Steinruck) creates a giant warrior (Paul Wegener) to protect the safety of his people. Sculpted of clay and animated by the mysterious secrets of the Kabbalah, the Golem is a seemingly indestructible juggernaut, performing acts of great heroism, yet equally capable of dreadful violence. When the rabbi's assistant (Ernst Deutsch) takes control of the Golem and attempts to use him for selfish gain, the lumbering monster runs rampant, abducting the rabbi's daughter (Lyda Salmonova) and setting fire to the ghetto. With its remarkable creation sequence (a dazzling blend of religion, sorcery and special effects) and the grand-scale destruction of its climax,The Golem was one of the greatest achievements of the legendary UFA Studios, and remains an undeniable landmark in the evolution of the horror film. Show less
The Kid (1921) Starring Charlie Chaplin and Jackie Coogan
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Charlie Chaplin was sitting atop the movie world in 1921 when he decided (against heavy studio resistance) to make THE KID, his first dramatic comedy -- a...Show more Charlie Chaplin was sitting atop the movie world in 1921 when he decided (against heavy studio resistance) to make THE KID, his first dramatic comedy -- a tale of an abandoned baby (portrayed by an adorable Jackie Coogan, who the public would later love as 'Uncle Fester on TV show The Addams Family) adopted by an impoverished tramp and the life they build together. A reviewer from Theatre Magazine glowingly wrote, "[Chaplin's] new picture, The Kid, certainly outdoes in humor and the special brand of Chaplin pathos anything this popular film star has yet produced. There are almost as many tears as laughs in the new First National release--which proves the contention that Chaplin as almost as good a tragedian as he is a comedian. The Kid may be counted as a screen masterpiece." Show less
F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu (1922)
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An unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula, NOSFERATU is the quintessential silent vampire film, crafted by legendary German director F. W. Murna...Show more An unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula, NOSFERATU is the quintessential silent vampire film, crafted by legendary German director F. W. Murnau. Rather than depicting Dracula as a shape-shifting monster or debonair gentleman, Murnau's Graf Orlok (as portrayed by Max Schreck) is a nightmarish, spidery creature of bulbous head and taloned claws -- perhaps the most genuinely disturbing incarnation of vampirism yet envisioned. Show less
Girl Shy (1924) starring Harold Lloyd
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Harold is a shy tailor's apprentice who has a pronounced stutter and is afraid of girls. He spends his lonely evenings writing a book called The Secret of...Show more Harold is a shy tailor's apprentice who has a pronounced stutter and is afraid of girls. He spends his lonely evenings writing a book called The Secret of Love Making until he is galvanized into action when he discovers that the girl he loves (Jobyna Ralston) is about to marry a bigamist. What follows is arguably the greatest race-to-the-rescue sequence of the entire silent cinema. The film's ending was the inspiration for Mike Nichols' The Graduate (1967) over forty years later. One of Lloyd's most influential and important films. Show less
Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1927)
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Perhaps the most famous and influential of all silent films, METROPOLIS had for 75 years been seen only in shortened or truncated versions. Now, restored ...Show more Perhaps the most famous and influential of all silent films, METROPOLIS had for 75 years been seen only in shortened or truncated versions. Now, restored in Germany with state-of-the-art digital technology, under the supervision of the Murnau Foundation, and with the original 1927 orchestral score by Gottfried Huppertz added, METROPOLIS can be appreciated in its full glory. METROPOLIS takes place in 2026, when the populace is divided between workers who must live in the dark underground and the rich who enjoy a futuristic city of splendor. The tense balance of these two societies is realized through images that are among the most famous of the 20th century. Lavish and spectacular, with elaborate sets and modern science fiction style, METROPOLIS stands today as the crowning achievement of the German silent cinema. Show less
Diary Of A Lost Girl (1929) starring Louise Brooks
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Diary of a Lost Girl represents the second and final work of one of the cinema's most compelling collaborations: G. W. Pabst and Louise Brooks. Diary conf...Show more Diary of a Lost Girl represents the second and final work of one of the cinema's most compelling collaborations: G. W. Pabst and Louise Brooks. Diary confirmed Pabst's artistry as one of the great directors of the silent period and established Brooks as an "actress of brilliance, a luminescent personality and a beauty unparalleled in screen history." (Kevin Brownlow, The Parade's Gone By) Show less
Man With A Movie Camera (1929) w/ music by the Alloy Orchestra
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"I am an eye. A mechanical eye. I am the machine that reveals the world to you as only the machine can see it." - Dziga Vertov, "Kino-Eye&q...Show more "I am an eye. A mechanical eye. I am the machine that reveals the world to you as only the machine can see it." - Dziga Vertov, "Kino-Eye" These words, written in 1923 reflect pioneering Soviet filmmaker Vertov's approach to cinema as an art form that shuns traditional or Western narrative in favor of images from real life. They lay the foundation for what would become the crux of Vertov's revolutionary, anti-bourgeois aesthetic wherein the camera is an extension of the human eye, capturing "the chaos of visual phenomena filling the universe." Over the next decade-and-a-half, Vertov would devote his life to the construction and organization of these raw images, his apotheosis being the landmark 1929 film The Man with the Movie Camera. In it, he comes closest to realizing his theory of 'Kino-Eye,' creating a new, more ambitious and more significant picture than what the eye initially perceives. The Man with the Movie Camera features musical accompaniment by Boston-based ensemble, The Alloy Orchestra. Show less
The General (1929) starring Buster Keaton
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Consistently ranked among the greatest films ever made, Buster Keaton's The General is so brilliantly conceived and executed that it continues to inspire ...Show more Consistently ranked among the greatest films ever made, Buster Keaton's The General is so brilliantly conceived and executed that it continues to inspire awe and laughter with every viewing. Buster Keaton plays Johnny Gray, a Southern railroad engineer during the Civil War who loves his train engine, The General, almost as much as he loves Annabelle Lee (Marion Mack). But when Northern spies steal both, it's up to Gray to rescue them both in every outrageous way possible. Keaton's self-performed stunts are at their height, and his comedic timing, impeccable. Show less
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